We have identified a fundamental concern with the current ISEs on the market – drift of the reference electrode/system.

Drift is the gradual change in reference electrode response over time and is caused by changes to the reference system that are impossible to prevent. These changes to the reference system change the reference baseline against which the sensors measurement are based leading to inaccurate sensor readings.

Drift over time means that ISEs cannot provide accurate measurements over long duration’s of time without calibration by the user. Consequently, many ISEs cannot be used for autonomous, in-situ operation, which is the preferred mode of operation for all sensors as it allows for networked, low maintenance monitoring. The overall objective of this project is to research, develop and produce a modified laboratory scale prototype sensor with the novel in-situ/autonomous system for correcting drift in the sensor’s reference. This will allow us to validate the technology and demonstrate its capabilities. The prototype sensor will be a glass electrode pH sensor as this is the most ubiquitous/commercially significant type of sensor to use the novel system. Therefore, the project fits within the ‘Industrial research’ category.

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